Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Interview of Rudi Peterschinigg

In this week's interview, we are talking with one of the most friendly players on the circuit. Rudi Peterschinigg lives in England but he's from Italy and he has travelled to several nations in the last few months to play subbuteo.

When did you first started to play Subbuteo and what was the first team you got bought?

I did start to play in Italy in 1984, at a friend of mine's house, fell in love after 10 seconds for the game after I saw this miniature touching the ball after a long curl L/W they were, if I don't remember wrong the first team I've bought was an Inter Milan set for the equivalent of 4€ nowadays.
Rudi (left) with Belgium's Dirk Vekemans in June 2013
How many years have you been playing and what are the main titles you have collected at any level? 

I've played from 1984 till 1989/90 when I left for the army, won a lot of tournaments back in my hometown in Italy, and I became very popular because of that but nothing outside my kingdom, and after I re-started to play about September 2012, a total different game, I didn't win anything in particular, so far a couple of WASPA finals lost and the satisfaction of going trough qualifiers in Mons beating a former number 1 and one time Mons Winner.

What is the best thing about this game and why would you recommend it to someone?

Definitely the passion, the fun and the athmosphere you can breath at tournaments, and top of it the fact that you interact with other game lovers like you rather than pushing buttons of a pad behind a playstation, that's why I would recommend to anyone, to socialise and have fun in group, thing that we forgot how to do these days.

Your most memorable moments from this game happy or even sad?

That's a good question, memorable is each time a new tournament begins, sad is when exhausted you making your way back home after a great week end of flicking the plastic (C. Tarry).
The most difficult player I've beaten is probably the only one I've beaten at major tournament, my Scottish friend Dave Baxter ( I must have been on drug that night in Fremeries lol), my favourite player at the moment, taking Vasco Guimaraes out of the equation as he's from another planet I'm really liking Bjorn Kegenbhein at the moment, the boy plays so calm, fast and cool that is a pleasure to watch.

Who was your most difficult opponent to beat and who is your favorite player and why?

The most difficult player I've beaten is probably the only one I've beaten at major tournament, my Scottish friend Dave Baxter (I must have been on drug that night in Frameries, lol), my favourite player at the moment, taking Vasco Guimaraes out of the equation as he's from another planet I'm really liking Bjorn Kegenbhein at the moment, the boy plays so calm, fast and cool that is a pleasure to watch.
To me it's both like any other sport that is also a game, I don't honestly know a sport which is not a game, if they call poker or darts a sport then Subbuteo or table football is definitely a sporty game, you sweat, you move around the table you got to concentrate, you get stressed, you celebrate when you score (well most do) and you get mad when you concede a goal, what else would you need to be a sport?

Is it a sport or a game ? What is your opinion about this question that many people ask?

To me it's both like any other sport that is also a game, I don't honestly know a sport which is not a game, if they call poker or darts a sport then Subbuteo or table football is definitely a sporty game, you sweat, you move around the table you got to concentrate, you get stressed, you celebrate when you score (well most do) and you get mad when you concede a goal, what else would you need to be a sport? Without forgetting that is always a game too.

What improvements would you like to see in the future and what would you suggest to improve things?

An improvement about the rules, to make them much more clearer, a quick meeting prior a tournament to recap the rules would be an idea, while organisers sorting out the paper work a quick debrief of 5, 10 mins with questions previously picked from email and stuff could have a massive impact in players behaviours towards the referees in my opinion. On the gaming part instead I'd like to see more Table football and Subbuteo been played in the same time, same venue, maybe run the Subbuteo tournament during the teams event to keep who is been knocked out or doesn't have a team in the venue much longer in order to have more people during the prize ceremony.

What would you recommend to someone who starts the game now? What are the secrets for top performance.

I'd tell him/her to take it for what it is, a social congregation of people sharing the same passion and not to be put off by the amount of matches you'd lose or the goals you'll concede as only by learning from the best you can become a better player.

Rudi's passport

Name: Rudi Peterschinigg
Age: 43
Nation: Italian (but playing under English national flag as I live in London)
Club: London & Essex Utd
Type of figures/bases used: Cc2 dynamics by Astrobase, Snake by tchaaa4
Profession: Restaurant manager
Hobbies: Football, tennis, golf and Subbuteo in no particular order

"All the best wishes for the forthcoming Easter to you all at the club and at WASPA."

(Interview by Panos Panagiotides)